AT&T agrees to drop bid for T-Mobile

DALLAS (AP) - AT&T says it is ending its $39 billion bid to buy T-Mobile USA after facing fierce government objections.

The cellphone giant said Monday that the actions of the government to block the deal do not change the challenges of the wireless phone industry, which it says requires more airwaves to expand.

AT&T's purchase of T-Mobile from Deutsche Telekom of Germany would have made it the largest cellphone company in the U.S. AT&T is currently the country's second-largest wireless carrier, while T-Mobile is the fourth-largest.

The Justice Department sued to block the merger on Aug. 31, saying it would reduce competition and lead to higher prices.

Last month, the companies withdrew their application to the Federal Communications Commission after its chairman also opposed the deal.

Vonya B. McCann, senior vice president of Government Affairs for Sprint , issued the following statement Monday:

"Earlier today, AT&T terminated its definitive merger agreement with Deutsche Telekom to acquire T-Mobile USA. This is the right decision for consumers, competition and innovation in the wireless industry.

From the beginning, Sprint has stood with consumers who spoke loudly and clearly that AT&T's proposed takeover of T-Mobile would create an undeniable duopoly that would have resulted in higher prices, less innovation and fewer choices for the American consumer.

Sprint commends the Department of Justice, the Federal Communications Commission and the bi-partisan group of state attorneys general who gave voice to the concerns of consumers across the country. We look forward to competing fiercely in the robust, competitive market that exists today and continuing to deliver the world class service and products that consumers have come to expect from Sprint."


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