North Carolina pastor retracts sermon remarks about punching gay kids

(CNN) - A Fayetteville, North Carolina, pastor has retracted controversial language used during a weekend sermon in which he instructed parents to hit children who exhibited behavior associated with homosexuality.

"I apologize to anyone I have unintentionally offended," Sean Harris, pastor of Berean Baptist Church wrote in a statement on his church's website. "I did not say anything to intentionally offend anyone in the LGBT community.

"My intent was to communicate the truth of the Word of God concerning marriage," the statement continued. "My words were not scripted. It is unfortunate I was not more careful and deliberate."

Harris's remarks at his church came a week before the state's voters consider an amendment to North Carolina's constitution limiting legal unions to marriage between a man and a woman.

"The second you see your son dropping that left wrist, you walk over there and crack that wrist," Harris said in the Sunday sermon. "Man up. Give him a good punch."

"You're not going to act like that," the pastor advised parents to tell their children. "You were made by God to be a male and you are going to be a male."

In an interview with the Fayetteville Observer, Harris said his comments were meant as a joke. In a video of the sermon posted online, laughter can be heard from some members of the congregation, as well as cries, of "Amen!" as the pastor spoke about responding to seemingly gay kids.

Berean Baptist explains its stance on discipline of children on its website:

"Remembering the love and forgiveness that God has shown them, parents in turn should train their children with the purpose of reflecting the Heavenly Father to their children. Parents should consider their responsibility to be the instrument of discipline in their child's life (Prov. 19:18). At times this may include appropriate and reasonable physical means (Prov. 10:13) employed upon the fleshy portion of the child's buttocks (Prov. 22:15; 23:13); that this method is to be viewed as correction rather than punishment (Prov. 23:13); and that this correction will result in the child's physical and spiritual betterment."

Harris told the Observer that from within his church, "the response was, 'Pastor, we know you didn't mean that.'"


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