Romeo Crennel: I don't know what made Jovan Belcher snap

Coach opens up about linebacker's final moments

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Everybody has personal issues, Kansas City Chiefs head coach Romeo Crennel said Monday.

That included linebacker Jovan Belcher, who shot and killed his girlfriend at the Kansas City home they shared with their daughter and his mother, then drove to Arrowhead Stadium and took his own life in front of Crennel, General Manager Scott Pioli and Defensive Coordinator Gary Gibbs in the parking lot of the team's practice facility.

READ | Jovan Belcher police report http://bit.ly/TDk9dh

But Crennel, who has been coaching in the NFL for more than 30 years, said Belcher had no major troubles in his life, that he knew of.

"I'm not a psychologist," Crennel told the media at his weekly Monday afternoon news conference. "I don't know what made him snap."

Belcher seemed like a strong-willed individual, Crennel said. "To me, he was a leader. He was sitting in the front of the classroom. He was first to drills. You were surprised by the events of the last few days."

RELATED | What Belcher's family in Kansas City is saying http://bit.ly/YKJGUN

Crennel said he had never seen Belcher with a gun before, and touched on the issue of gun ownership by NFL players .

Crennel said he didn't know Belcher had shot his girlfriend when he talked with Belcher in the moments before he ended his life.

"I was trying to get him to understand that life is not over, he still has a chance and let's get this worked out," Crennel said.

The coach who has earned respect from fans and media across the country for coaching his team to victory after Saturday's events, said things might never be the same.

"It's not over and it might not be over for some of us for the rest of our lives," Crennel said. "But time heals all wounds."

Chiefs owner Clark Hunt gave Crennel the option Saturday afternoon of whether or not to play the game, Hunt said Sunday.

Crennel called the six team captains, and after discussing it with them, decided they should play.

"I think playing the game helped," Crennel said. "It really did. It took our mind off the sorrow and put our focus on the field."

Crennel says right now, he's just trying to deal with it and be a leader for his team.

"I can deal with stress," Crennel said. "I can deal with greif. So I 'm dealing with it by trying to be the leader that hose men upstairs need."

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